Neshta'sPlace

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

wsswatson:

fk4eva:

marinashutup:

in which the actor who plays one of television’s least likeable characters is actually super considerate and cool

How can he be such a despicable cunt, then…

It’s like when you have Zachary Quinto who, apart from Spock, mostly plays serial killers and creepy as fuck supervillains being ridiculously adorkable and lovely in real life

dancys:

Hawkeye #1


A classic.

A classic.

IIiiit’s Bell! I realized that I haven’t drawn her in so long and I felt that had to be rectified! For those not in the know, this is Bell, she’s one of my oldest characters. She’s a fire mage who is mysteriously linked to fire, so much so that she’s brimming with fire magic, and flames don’t hurt her at all.

IIiiit’s Bell! I realized that I haven’t drawn her in so long and I felt that had to be rectified! For those not in the know, this is Bell, she’s one of my oldest characters. She’s a fire mage who is mysteriously linked to fire, so much so that she’s brimming with fire magic, and flames don’t hurt her at all.

malisteen:

saintcheshire:

So I just got back last night from a brony convention in San Francisco. I was working a booth for a vendor friend, and let me tell you what happened:

We met a little girl who was there with her family. She got a button drawn at our booth, told us all about…

locsgirl:

think-progress:

The criminalization of the homeless.

A backpack. Spare clothes. A notebook. Some keepsake photos. Crackers.

Though they may not have a home in which to secure their stuff, homeless people still have possessions like everyone else.

Yet the city of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida is on the cusp of passing a new regulation that would make it illegal for anyone to store their personal things on public property. Specifically, it would empower police to confiscate any personal possessions stored on public property, provided they have given the homeless person 24-hours notice. If the homeless people wish to retrieve their items, they must pay the city “reasonable charges for storage and removal of the items,” though that fee is waived if the person is able to demonstrate he or she cannot afford to pay. The city may dispose of any possessions not retrieved within 30 days. One of the driving factors behind the measure, according to the legislation, is the city’s “interest in aesthetics.”

Last week, the City Commission gave unanimous preliminary approval to the measure, despite overwhelming opposition from local residents who testified.

One woman, Gazol Tajalli, told Commissioners that is “insanity that we are even here discussing whether an individual can put on the ground the few objects that they own.” Another citizen, Rev. Gail Tapscott of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Ft. Lauderdale, criticized some of the Commissioners for “demoniz[ing]” the homeless.

Maria Foscarinis, Executive Director of the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty, chastised Ft. Lauderdale’s approach. “Maintaining city streets is a legitimate concern, but simply punishing homeless people for leaving their possessions in public places is not an effective or humane way to address it,” she told ThinkProgress. “Instead, city and business leaders should work with advocates and homeless people to develop alternative short and long term solutions, such as public storage options for homeless people and affordable housing.”

According to the Sun Sentinel, “The commission’s actions were backed by business leaders who said they were looking for some controls on a situation that scares away customers and makes visitors uncomfortable.” The commission is also considering other initiatives targeting the homeless, including stiffer penalties for urinating or defecating in public, prohibitions on panhandling at intersections or sleeping in public, and restrictions on charity groups that hand out food to the homeless.

Ft. Lauderdale is not the only city to embrace new ordinances that criminalize people for being homeless. Scores of cities, including ColumbiaPalo AltoMiamiRaleighTampa, Harrisburg, and others have enacted measures that render homeless people simply trying to survive as criminals. Other cities, like Davis, California, are taking a different approach: constructing public lockers where homeless people can safely store their possessions.

If this shit is real that’s depressing!

mogaththedk:

Now then we’re gonna paint a little Unhappy tree covered in the blood of my enemies.

This is for you, hun

mogaththedk:

Now then we’re gonna paint a little Unhappy tree covered in the blood of my enemies.

This is for you, hun

gailsimone:

america-wakiewakie:

1. Single moms are the problem. Only 9 percent of low-income, urban moms have been single throughout their child’s first five years. Thirty-five percent were married to, or in a relationship with, the child’s father for that entire time.

2. Absent dads are the problem. Sixty percent of low-income dads see at least one of their children daily. Another 16 percent see their children weekly.

3. Black dads are the problem. Among men who don’t live with their children, black fathers are more likely than white or Hispanic dads to have a daily presence in their kids’ lives.

4. Poor people are lazy. In 2004, there was at least one adult with a job in 60 percent of families on food stamps that had both kids and a nondisabled, working-age adult.

5. If you’re not officially poor, you’re doing okay. The federal poverty line for a family of two parents and two children in 2012 was $23,283. Basic needs cost at least twice that in 615 of America’s cities and regions.

6. Go to college, get out of poverty. In 2012, about 1.1 million people who made less than $25,000 a year, worked full time, and were heads of household had a bachelor’s degree.

7. We’re winning the war on poverty. The number of households with children living on less than $2 a day per person has grown 160 percent since 1996, to 1.65 million families in 2011.

8. The days of old ladies eating cat food are over. The share of elderly single women living in extreme poverty jumped 31 percent from 2011 to 2012.

9. The homeless are drunk street people. One in 45 kids in the United States experiences homelessness each year. In New York City alone, 22,000 children are homeless.

10. Handouts are bankrupting us. In 2012, total welfare funding was 0.47 percent of the federal budget.

Reblog a thousand times.

I have been poor. I have lived in serious poverty. 

I worked as hard then as I do now, and I work very hard indeed, as did almost everyone else I knew who was poor, regardless of background, ethnicity, or marriage status. 

We all know these things the wealthy and entitled say are lies…why do we allow that to continue to be the narrative?

Contents Under Pressure

ruckawriter:

I rarely use this to just blog. I’m going to just blog now, so you can all just ignore this if it’s not to your liking.

Warning. Contents under pressure.

Read More

If this is real

Oh boy! If this is an actual, real thing, I would be one happy mama jamma!

http://io9.com/joel-hodgson-wants-to-resurrect-mystery-science-theater-1566056299